26 Comments

One thing that really helped me overcome my financial mindset limitations was to imagine "future me." Every time I made a spending decision, instead of agonizing over whether to do it, I just imagined myself 10 years down the road. If I could see how much better not spending would make 10-years-hence me, I would save. If not, I would spend.

I think I found a reasonable balance this way. 2007 was a turning point for me as well.

Expand full comment
Aug 9, 2023Liked by Astrid Bracke

Oh my goodness this was oh so relevant to me right now. I’m an artist and it is sometimes incredibly difficult to change the money story I often have on repeat. I literally am about to commit myself to a much bigger studio space and higher rent. So I really needed to hear this today 👩🏼‍🎨🙌🏻✨

Expand full comment

Reading this at a time when I am so worried about money is great timing. Two weeks ago I felt safe about money because I have a day job that pays well. So safe, in fact, that I spent a large sum of money moving to another state. And then something changed at work and now I no longer feel safe. Now my generous salary feels uncertain at best. Even though I have been told that my job is safe it doesn't feel that way and I have started a long string of catastrophic "what ifs" in my head.

Growing up I wasn't really taught to save. For a few years now I have managed to save by being extreme about it: save everything, spend nothing, has been my style--sort of the other end of the scale from not saving lol. Now I am struggling to feel comfortable in that middle ground of saving and spending. I'm going to try to come up with some positive "what ifs" to balance the scales. ☺️

Expand full comment

I love money. Always have and always will. Whenever I got money as a child, I saved it all up and spent it at Christmas time - I bought lots of sweets for myself as that was one thing my parents never bought for me 😅

Save for a rainy day and money doesn’t grow in trees are two phrases I remember hearing while growing up. The money doesn’t grow on trees was used in relation to always spend on needs first before wants. In other words prioritise your spending.

I rarely spent money as a child as I didn’t need anything. Once I opened a bank account all my money went in there. Somehow I started spending less than I was given and the extra money got saved. I no longer spent money on sweets in my teens 🙂

Fast forward to full blown adulthood and my mantra is save, invest, spend.

What am I saving for? To invest, to have rainy day funds, to purchase items not previously budgeted for, to cover months I spend to much.

What am I investing for? To watch the delights of compounding, to get dividends, to buy time.

What am I spending on? Food, accomodation, utilities, socialising.

Do I have a healthy relationship with money? I hope so. I define respect what it can do for me. Do I make decisions solely based on money? Absolutely, not! That is a sure fire way to be unhappy. Does money bring me happiness? Only in terms of it buying me time.

I’ll stop here as I seem to have written a very long comment on your post.

BTW the money I love has to be my own and not somebody else’s.

Expand full comment

Happy early birthday Astrid! I love the jewelry you picked out. And thank you for sharing your perspective on money. As always, you have great questions and thought-provoking writing.

Expand full comment
Aug 8, 2023·edited Aug 8, 2023Liked by Astrid Bracke

Hi Astrid - first and foremost, thank you for writing about this delicate matter and sharing your experience so openly without shame or other adverse feelings. I find it truly inspiring that you write so freely and tickle readers to reflect on their own matters, an so shall I. Raised in a privilege environment, as an expat between East and West, I am now 35 years old and have absolutely no clue how to juggle with money. My father, on whose side I grew up, never spoke of administrative stuff such as taxes and so forth. He also never taught me how to budget. While some might start thinking "what a spoiled little girl", I can confirm you, that I was not foolishly spoiled and also worked my way through university. However, I will admit that I was raised in a protective bubble that I only grew aware of, after the expiration of my beloved father. Anyway, I did inherit a certain sum but instead of listening to the person in charge, who was appointed to help me go through life, I rebelled and gave all money away to build boarding schools in India. Absurd, some of you might exclaim - downright mad even. And you are very right to judge so. However, I wanted to free myself from a certain burden and so I did. However, I did not realise that I would appropriate another one instead. I had to learn from scratch how to deal with money, how to budget and track expenses and especially, how not to feel guilty about it. It's been a very strenuous journey because I studied subjects that do not generate a generous income. I cannot deny that there were moments when I regretted my foolishness but I continuously find comfort in the knowing that children can attend school thereof. My journey with financial matters is darkened by a huge shadow of guilt and shame. It took me a long time to grasp that I would need savings - absurd, right? - but there was simply always a safety net until there wasn't and little did I know... Therefore I am really grateful that you shared your story.

Expand full comment
Aug 8, 2023Liked by Astrid Bracke

Astrid you are going to love the House of WE!

Expand full comment
Aug 8, 2023Liked by Astrid Bracke

It’s hard breaking away from our inherited views on money. I think I’m getting there, but it’s taken a while! Great piece which has got me thinking about this topic. Thanks 🙏

Expand full comment